Southowram-Pictures 

A collection of old Southowram-Pictures. A massive thank you to Malcolm Bull for many of these pictures http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~calderdalecompanion/ 


All aboard the bus tour through Southowram starting at the bottom of Beacon Hill road towards Bank Top.

Bus coming back down Beacon Hill Road

Heading up Beacon Hill Road - landslide

Beacon Hill Road looking towards Claremount.

Here you can see all the houses that there used to be up Southowram Bank.

These houses were near the Magna Via at the bottom of Old Bank (towards Charlestown).


Duke William

Southowram Bank bottom. I think the gable end in the centre is that of the pub 'Dyer and Miller'. The pub was demolished some time before World War I.

Near the bottom of Old Bank


Nicholls shop at the end of Blaithroyd Lane

Looking down Old Bank from above Blaithroyd Lane.


Bankfield Farm, Marsh Lane/Long Lane

Apparently this is Battinson Street. Does anyone recognise the girl?


Bethesda Chapel. This was just below the Manor House pub.


Manor House

Never forgotten.  

Personally, I had some of my lifetime favourite memories here with a really good crowd of regulars. This was when Pat and Kev had the pub and it never seemed to close. All that remains today is the bar signpost.

Remember the race back from town on a Sunday night before the doors closed?

Sunday morning football was a sight for sore eyes. Not really surprising that we lost by big margins after big drinks marathons. Even after getting thrashed, you wouldn't believe we had lost if you ever witnessed our Sunday afternoon/night shenanigans.

Can you name some players from that era?

Who remembers the pre Pat/and Kev days?


This is looking towards Bank Top in 1901 and to the right of the picture is the Cock and Bottle pub(below). The visible pub was the Blue Bell that burned down. 


Zion Sunday School opposite the Cock and Bottle pub.


Looking towards Bank Top from the bottom of Broadway.


Anyone know why they are marching?


This is Law Hill School where Emily Bronte taught for 6 months.


Pinnar Lane once had an observatory which stood around the Highfield farm area.

Richardson, William (1804-1878), of High Field, Southowram, near Halifax, gave lectures on astronomy, geology, electricity and other scientific topics. He had an observatory built at High Field (which was demolished in the 1950s/60s). The Bronte family attended some of his public lectures at Howarth. He was a friend of William Cobbett, the radical journalist. Richardson is buried at St Anne's-in-the-Grove Church at Southowram.

The source for this is Astronomy history in Yorkshire


The  'Who Could A' Thowt It'  Pub

Coming from town, before you get to Withinfields school this would be down the road to the left of the bend (waterclough lane).


World war 2 army camp on Law Lane opposite the school.




Law Lane in 1957.
The view, from the former chemist shop at 16 Law Lane is looking north towards Townley Avenue and Withinfields.
The long garden wall right of shot borders the former Yew Trees House, then owned by a branch of the Marshall family.
The barn centre mid-distance was, I believe, used by green-grocer Albert Naylor to house his horse and green-grocery delivery cart.

Robert Harrison

A further snow shot of Law Lane in 1957.
The young guy in the centre of the shot, holding the basket, is Jeff Bancroft, who worked for and delivered meat for Moreton's Butchers at Bank Top (hence the baskets). The young boy is myself. I am not certain of the names of the other people in the picture.

Robert Harrison


The chemist shop was opened and run by Frank Harrison from 1953/54 until his retirement in 1992. It is currently a sandwich shop cafe, the chemist having moved to the doctor's surgery further along Law Lane.
The sweet shop next door has seen many owners over the years. It was opened by Mr and Mrs Murray in the early 1950s. It then passed to Mr and Mrs Gomersall (the name seen here) in the mid-1950s. Mr and Mrs Farrell took over in the late 1950s. Gerry Morrison, on the retirement of Mr Doran, at the far end of Towngate, applied for the Southowram Post Office being transferred here in the early 1960s.


Law Lane from 1957.
The snow here is in and outside the driveway to the former chemist shop at 16 Law Lane. The small, stone garden wall is no more.
The pre-fabricated garage, typical of the day, had an asbestos roof, the main danger then being its weakness to withstand walking weight, particularly from playing children.
The blocks right and left of the driveway were built in the early 1950s by Brighouse builder, Colin Whitehead on land originally owned by local quarryman, Benny Thompson. The shop, left mid-distance, for many years a fish and chips shop, was opened as a green-grocers by Mr and Mrs Albert Naylor. Albert also toured local streets with a horse-drawn, ornate, green cart. The building above the hillside gardens in the background is a wooden garage in land known as The Field.

Robert Harrison


Law Lane in deep snow (1957) towards Cain Lane and Towngate from the former chemist shop at 16 Law Lane.
The Southowram Library has for many years occupied the site right foreground.
The house set back, right mid-distance, was occupied by the local Southowram Policeman, the last occupant, I believe, being Alan Marshal. Green-grocer, Fred Lees, also moved to a shop in the terrace right mid-distance, his original shop being located in a 17th century residence (long demolished) at the corner of Pinnar Lane and what in those days was a rough track known as The Entry (now Yeadon Drive).
The Southowram Co-Op stands at the corner of Law Lane and Cain Lane, left mid-distance.
The Pack Horse Inn also stands left mid-distance.
The building centre background, along Towngate, was, at that time, occupied by a butcher's shop next to a newsagents run by Joan and Colin Barratt. The newsagents was taken over by Gordon Buckley around 1959/1960.
The roads in those days were often cleared by snow-ploughs fixed to Marshall stone wagons.
The shot was taken by my father, Frank Harrison, who was the chemist at Southowram from 1953/54 until retirement in 1992.
Robert Harrison


Now a warehouse but once the Co-op stores(see below) and the Halifax Industrial Society before that. Positioned opposite the Pack Horse.


thanks to Jenny McGall for this picture

This is an old view of Southowram village. Just left of centre is the Pack Horse junction. Some big differences are the lack of houses where Charles Avenue etc. now exists. There are no buildings where the library and shops now exists. There is a farm facing the Pack Horse at the bottom of Pinnar Lane


Looking from bottom of Yeadon Drive area towards Towngate (once known as The Entry).


Social Club


Towngate in the 1950s. Richardsons Row are the terraced houses on the right but can anyone tell us what the other buildings are? There were several shops around this area at one time.

With reference to the Southowram photograph of Towngate in the 1950s, I thought you might be interested in the names of several shops operating along Towngate and New Street at that time.
1) The canopy, left foreground, is above the entrance steps to Broomhead's Fish and Chip shop, operated by Mary and Hilda Broomhead. Sometime in the 1960s, this became a hairdressers, as seen in the photograph of the corner of West Lane with the 30 Halifax Corporation Bus.
2) Next to Broomhead's, where the phone box is, is the Southowram Post Office, operated by Mr and Mrs Doran. This also, in the 1960s, changed location to Law Lane, next to the Southowram Library.
3) Out of shot, to the right, was the Economic Grocery Store.
4) The tall building, right mid-distance, at the top of New Street, is the grocery shop of Mr and Mrs Bill Popplewell. Ronnie Denton, who later opened a shop in Brighouse, also worked there.
5) Along New Street, next to Popplewell's, was a complex housing Wilf Marshall's Gents' Hairdressers, Nancy Hawtrey Ladies' Hairdressers and a cafe serving pie and peas, well patronised by workmen at lunch-time. Also along New Street, approaching the Jubilee Inn, was another Fish and Chip Shop. All these New Street shop premises have long been demolished.
6) Further along Towngate, right of shot, was Hurst's Drapery Store, with Miss Sykes behind the counter.
7) Towngate in the 1950s, right background, not far from its intersection with Cain Lane, was also the location of Mr Dobbie's Cobblers shop. This later moved to Bank Top, near the Cock and Bottle.
8) Barratt's, and later Buckley's, Newsagents lay next to a butcher's shop left background. In the 1950s the newsagents was operated by Joan Barratt and her husband Colin.
I, myself, approaching 65, was a small resident of Southowram 1953-1960. I visited all the shops above and have vivid memories of them all. Towngate in the 1950s was the shopping centre of Southowram. Road widening and the demolition of old properties have greatly changed the scene. The shopping centre has also migrated to Law Lane since the 1950s.
Robert Harrison


Southowram stocks


The corner of  West Lane.


Opposite the garage on the corner of West Lane where haulage company Lincoln Shackleton & Sons used to work from. They often used to deliver stone for Marshalls.


S Marshall quarry

Ashday Lane Sunday School formerly known as Heald Lane. Further down Ashday Lane, where the cricket ground now stands, used to be the workhouse which dated back to at least the 1740's and the name 'Old Workhouse Quarry' was still current until at least the 1890's. There was also a row of terraced houses past the ground.


Ashday Lane with Inghams sausage factory which is now Grange Heights


Ashday Hall


Ashday Hall


Looking up Caine Lane- still very recognisable


Shoulder of Mutton


Jubilee (The Rock) down New Street


St Annes in the Grove 1908


St.Annes church can be seen in the background


This is just about opposite the Malt Shovel going towards Brighouse. What year would this have been?


Barker Royd Farm and Mill off the main road behind what was the Malt Shovel


Cote Hill


Marshalls Quarry

This is a recent photograph and as you can see, the pub name (Delvers Arms) is still visible.

Bought By Ramsdens Brewery in 1910. The Pub closed in the late 1940’s.Originally owned by John Naylor (1829 1912) who built The Victoria and The Albion Brewery in 1858. His Company was the "John Naylor & Company". He acquired several Ale Houses around the Halifax area and sold them eventually in 1910, two years before his death.

Phil Griffin


The notorious Brookfoot Hill. Many a wagon driver has had a tale to tell about this hill.
The building you can see is the Neptune Inn. (also pictured below)

See Brookfoot photos at the bottom of the Brighouse photos page. Click here


Waterclough Hall

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/HEMINGWAY-UK/1999-04/0924441345


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